Tag Archive | New Publication

What’s Been Happening?

Hi Everyone!

Wow, I’ve been absent for a bit. I need to apologize to my readers. Had a little run-in with the big C and required surgery and various and sundry treatments.

So far—so good!

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In the meantime, I have been very lax in getting any blogging or writing done.

Some of my authors have been hard at work and so I’ve managed to get some stuff edited. That kept my brain working and filled my time.

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Donna Jean McDunn has completed the third book in her Nightmares Series. Premonitions will be coming out soon from MuseItUp Publishing. Also The Rose Stalker came out recently. Now there’s a super story! A slow paced little number that will keep you turning the pages as it gets scarier and scarier. Donna did a nice job on that one.

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Rosemary Morris and I just finished the edits on Monday’s Child, a sequel to her wonderful Regency Romance, Sunday’s Child. It is well done and the last few chapters were just great. It is set during the Napoleonic wars and her writing about those events, the soldiers involved in the fighting, the wounded, well, you feel like you’re right there.

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One thing about Rosemary, she is not one of those historical writers who set a 20th century character in the middle of another time. Her characters are genuine and part of the era. Her settings are well researched. The descriptions of the clothes, amazing. Just so well done!

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Have a new author I’m just finishing working with named William J. Dezell.

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We did It’s The Little Things You Miss. Oh, what a nice story. A mystery, but I loved the flavour of the book. A detective story with a fellow who should have been born in the Sam Spade era. Great lines. Super descriptions. Lots of wit. I’ll keep you updated on its progress. Bill’s other work:

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My author, J. Troy Seate, has moved on to another House. I just loved working with Troy and hope he does well wherever he goes.

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I have a couple of editing projects on my desk right now in the private field. One is a Historical Romance and the other is a Historical Word War Two Paranormal Action Adventure. Can’t wait to get my teeth into them! In the mean time, I have a couple of other projects to keep me busy.

 

I finished and published a book of Prayers which you can check out on my Exploring the Divine blog, www.exploringthedivine.wordpress.com  or my website, www.vlmurray.ca

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I have other things along those lines in the works right now. Plus my short story Huntin’,

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a paranormal thriller set in northern Canada, with a Medicine Wheel theme, was published in 2014. It’s a creepy little one. Lots of fun to write. Check out the book trailer on my website, and this site, as well.

 

I sure wish I had more time to sit down and work on my own things, but I’m gradually getting back into the swing of things.

So for now, I hope all is well with you. Take care, and enjoy the Spring!

Cheers,

Lynne

 

 

Interview with Susan Davis, content editor for “Huntin'”

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N&R: Hi Susan! Thank you for doing such a great job helping me to get this story up and running! I wanted to ask you a couple of questions concerning editing.

How did you get started in the editing world?

SD:My start was editing for members in a couple of my critique groups. I loved it…and there was one who believed in pointing out the strengths as well as the weak areas in the story. It was exactly what encouraged and motivated me to write.

It turns out to be what I love to do for the authors I work with at Muse It Up Publishing.
N&R: Was this a long time interest?

SD: English and composition has been a long time interest of mine, since high school years. It was my favorite subject and I wrote a number of books/stories during those very early years.

N&R:  Do you also write? If so what have you written?

SD: I’ve written a couple young adult novels (haven’t published any), and under a pseudonym I have a number of erotic romance novels, novellas, and short stories published through Muse It HOT an imprint of Muse It Up Publishing.

N&R:  What is the difference between content editing and line editing?

SD: Commas *LOL* Just kidding – content editing focuses on point of view discrepancies, subject matter making sense to the plot and the characters, validating facts and locations if necessary – actions and dialogue/style/voice staying in agreement/alignment with characters.

Line editing is a very important second set of eyes, checking for grammatical errors, spelling, and punctuation. In other words, they’ll polish it all to a gorgeous shiny finish: )

N&R:  What kind of advice would you give a newbie editor?

SD: Make sure to point out an author’s story strengths as well as the weak areas. It is hard work writing a story and in essence can be like baring a soul…sometimes it doesn’t take much to crush a writer’s spirit. Be an editor easy to work with by explaining your suggested changes, and also be the editor that you’d like to have editing your work: )

Thank you Susan. Wise words indeed. Once again I appreciate all the work you did on my story. I’m looking forward to working again with you in the future.

Lynne

Huntin” : A New Short Story coming out today from author, V. L. Murray

Friday November 21st, 2014 marks the release day for the paranormal short story Huntin’ , the latest from author V. L. Murray.

Huntin’ is a thriller which highlights the teachings of the Medicine Wheel as it lures the reader into the world of  a young man trying to escape his past.

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Here’s an excerpt from the story.

“Usually it was Hawk who called to her from above and helped her on her day’s journey, communicating with single piercing cries whenever she needed guidance. Hawk would appear in her dreams, sometimes showing the future.

He had come two weeks ago as she was dreaming, and told her the story of the hunt camp to come. She sighed again with resolve, knowing what she must do if Spirit was ever to return to her beloved son. Now, Wolf howled once more, and this time Jack looked up as if listening to its voice.

“I think he’s calling to you, my son. Wolf has been around a lot lately.”

A wry smile touched Jack’s face. “Maybe it’s just because he’s being driven out of his habitat by all the construction around here. Maybe he’s just complaining. I would.”

There was no point in arguing. He would understand soon enough. Now, she needed to continue her preparations for their journey. Much food had to be assembled, equipment and clothing, tools and tents. There were lots of things to do. And then there was some personal preparation she needed to finish. She hoped Hawk would come tonight in her dreams and refresh her memory of the future to be. She would find some sage for smudge and make herself ready for the night.”

“Huntin'”  can be purchased online at  http://tinyurl.com/km9p248  Amazon.ca link and amazon.com at  http://tinyurl.com/kymrykv

More coming this week on the story and the author.

 

The latest from Author Donna Jean McDunn

Donna Jean McDunn

Donna Jean McDunn is a writer of fiction for young adults, women’s romance and short stories for children and women. At the tender age of twelve, she dreamed of writing, but she had no way of knowing the many journeys she would take before reaching her dream. She married at nineteen, had three daughters by the age of twenty-seven and graduated from college at forty-two. The first of eight grandchildren was born by age forty-five. She earned a 3rd degree black belt in Songahm Taekwondo at age fifty-eight. And so today she writes and her dream is no longer just a dream. She has had three children’s stories and one adult story published. She was also one of nine winners in The Mystery Times Nine 2012 Young Adult Short Story Mystery Contest sponsored by Buddhapuss Ink Publishing.

Author’s Other Works:

Mystery Times Nine – An Anthology of nine short stories to be published Sept./Oct. 2012 by Buddhapuss Ink LLC

EMAIL    WEBSITE     BLOG


 The Nightmare Series

Young Adult Paranormal

Book One


 

Emily must accept her gift of clairvoyance and remember her past, when a psychopath returns to kill again.

Book Two


 

Emily must help a murdered child find closure and stop a vengeful ghost from possessing and destroying innocent lives.

Book Review: Mistletoe Magic by Melissa McClone

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Book Review: Mistletoe Magic by Melissa McClone ©2013

A Copper Mountain Christmas Novella/Short Story

Published by the Tule Publishing Group LLC   http://thetulegroup.com/

ISBN: 978-1-940296-19-7

File Size: 2583 KB

Print Length: 41 pages

Publisher: Tule Publishing Group; 1 edition (November 21, 2013)

Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.

Language: English

ASIN: B00GUZ195O

Text-to-Speech: Enabled 

X-Ray: Enabled 

Lending: Not Enabled

Publication Date: November 21, 2013

Amazon Link to purchase and read excerpt: http://tinyurl.com/mdh5wtu

My Review:

This is a fun novella about Caitlin Butler, a single young woman, who agrees to housesit for her friends in their beautiful home in Montana while they go to Idaho for Christmas with their family.

Caitlin is lonely and alone, missing her parents who have moved away and not having found Mr. Right, as of yet. However, she still maintains hope while teaching preschool in the local community.

We are next introduced to a young vet, Dr. Noah Sullivan, who has recently moved into town, starting a three-year commitment to a rural vet program in exchange for loan repayments. A win-win situation. He, too, has some issues with Christmas joy and the festivities of the season.

What transpires makes this a lovely heart-warming story for animal lovers and those who like Christmas romances.

It’s a quick read, with great descriptions, and a nice plot, It’s well written, though the odd missed typo was distracting to an OCD editor like myself.

I would have liked a few more chapters and so that’s why I am giving it four stars ****.  As an editor, I would have dragged a bit more out of Melissa and made this short story/novella into a longer work. But, that being said, what was written was done nicely. Great price at $0.97. I have purchased three more of her stories and will let you know what I think after I finish them.

Book Description:

Spending a quiet Christmas house sitting, and reading novels about hot cowboys, sounds perfect to Caitlin Butler, until a stray kitten brings her face-to-face with Noah, her crush from college. Watching the handsome vet in action melts Caitlin’s heart and brings back long forgotten emotions.

Veterinarian Noah Sullivan isn’t a Scrooge, but the Christmas Eve tradition of hanging mistletoe in the clinic’s waiting room annoys him. Kissing doesn’t belong at the Copper Mountain Animal Hospital. Noah rethinks his position when Caitlin arrives with the stray kitten she found freezing in the snow. All he wants now is to maneuver the pretty preschool teacher under the mistletoe. If he’s not careful, he’ll wind up on Santa’s naughty list. Mistletoe Magic is a short story companion to “The Copper Mountain Christmas Series”.

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About the Author

Melissa McClone graduated from Stanford University with a degree in mechanical engineering, but analyzing jet engine performance for a major airline couldn’t compete with her love of writing happily-ever-afters. She has published over twenty-five romance novels with Harlequin and been nominated for Romance Writers of America’s RITA award. She also writes for Tule Publishing Group. Melissa lives in the U.S. Pacific Northwest with her husband, three school-aged children, two spoiled Norwegian Elkhounds and cats who think they rule the house. They do! Author’s Blog link: http://www.melissamcclone.com/


Merry Christmas everyone!

Lynne

Interview with Author Renee Duke

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N&R: My guest today is author Renee Duke. Here’s a short biography of Renee.

          Renee Duke grew up in Ontario, and British Columbia, Canada, and Berkshire, England. Due to a treacherous re-drawing of county lines while she was out of the country, her little market town is now in Oxfordshire, but she’s still a Berkshire girl at heart.

As a child, her favourite authors were Enid Blyton, Anthony Buckeridge, and Thornton W. Burgess. When she became a teenager, it was Jean Plaidy, Norah Lofts, Robert A. Heinlein, and Edgar Rice Burroughs who fed her voracious reading habit.

Time for reading lessened after she went into teaching, as did time for writing, which she has been doing since she was seven (the age at which she realized stories were actually made up by someone). Her work has appeared in such publications as Reader’s Digest, Zamoof!, Stitches, and Our World 50+ (Canada); Spider, Story Friends, and Pockets (U.S.A.), and My Weekly, and The People’s Friend (U.K.).

Mother of one son and servant to two cats, she resides in Kelowna, B.C. with her widowed mother. She still does an occasional inter-active history unit with 6 to 12-year olds at an after-school care centre, but is otherwise ‘retired’ and able to concentrate on writing.

N&R: Hi Renee. Welcome to Natter and Review. It’s very nice to meet you.

RD: Thank you.  And thank you for allowing me to join you today.

Note to My Readers: We have a contest to win a copy of Ms. Duke’s book. The information is at the end of the posting. Good luck!

N&R: Can you tell us a little more about your early years? I see you have grown up in two different countries. How did that come about? And where exactly did you live in Ontario. That’s where I grew up and lived till I was forty-four.

RD: I grew up in both Canada and England because my family lived in both. During WW II, my mother and oldest brother lived in Scotland for a time, as well, to escape the bombing. My father was born in Scotland, and from childhood up, cherished a dream of playing the bagpipes. My Sassenach (English)-born mother was unaware of this when they met and married, and never did learn to like them. By WW II, my father’s family had dispersed to Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, and he served with the Canadian forces. He took his own branch back there afterwards, then back to England (twice – once on an extended visit, the other to live), and then back to Canada again, where we finally took up permanent residence in Kelowna, B.C. In Ontario, we lived Keewatin, which is close to the Manitoba border. I have dual citizenship, and an accent that I am told is neither British nor Canadian.

N&R: I see you had some favourite children’s authors including Thornton W. Burgess. I think I read everything he wrote. What were some of your most loved? Did any of those stories inspire you to create other works?

RD: My favourite Burgess books were The Adventures of Chatterer The Red Squirrel and The Adventures of Bob White. When I was little, I really liked Enid Blyton’s Noddy books, and when I was older, her Galliano’s Circus trilogy her Naughtiest Girl trilogy and the five books in her Secret series.  I don’t know that any of them inspired my own writing, but my very favourite childhood book was The Secret Garden, so that might have started me thinking that the past was ‘cool’.  And I do vaguely recall making up stories that featured characters from some books I read.  I won’t say which ones, in case their heirs decide to sue. (Let’s just call it ‘fan fiction’ – small children don’t understand plagiarism.)

N&R: I think most of us did that when we were young. Tell us a little about your teaching career. What ages did you teach and what subjects were your specialties?

RD: I was (and am still licensed to be) an Early Childhood Educator. From 1974 to 2000, I taught 2½ to 5-year-olds their ABCs and 123s, and threw in as much drama and history as I could.  In 1977, I went to Belize, Central America, with World Peace and Development, and spent the summer working with 3-8-year-olds. I was also a playground supervisor for Grades K-7 from 1996 to 2012.  From 2008 to the present I have been doing interactive history programmes with 6-13-year-olds in an Out-Of-School Care facility.

N&R: Wow, that’s amazing. So you sure haven’t lost your touch. You say in your bio that you started writing at the age of seven. I can relate to that. What kinds of things poured out of your heart at that age? Do you still have any of your early work?

RD: The first thing I remember writing came from having to choose a topic off the blackboard at school and write a story about it. I did one about the life of a banana peel. As I recall, it ran several pages. I do not, however, recall what it was about, other than there was a banana boat and a banana spider involved. The earliest work I still have (somewhere) is a short, syrupy poem about Spring that I penned when I was eight. How anything that awful ever got chosen for the school magazine, I will never know. I’m sure the Ralphie Rabbit readers another school printed out for use in the Infants Class a couple of years later were almost as bad, but I have no proof of that as we didn’t take any copies with us when we next moved. I was allowed to print those myself, with the help of three friends. We were supposedly under the supervision of our teacher, but he was rash enough to leave the room for a few minutes and came back to four ink-covered children (two girls, two boys). After scrubbing us reasonably clean, he probably went home thankful that we would soon be moving on to ‘big school’, which, in England, you did at age eleven. I also wrote plays and made a lot of comic books based on favourite TV shows, such as Thunderbirds).

N&R: Sounds like you were well on your way to a higher career. You certainly have a lot of stories out in the magazine publishing world. How did that come about for you? And was it all fiction or some non-fiction in the mix?

RD: I started sending stories and articles out to magazines when I was still in my teens. They came back with monotonous regularity, but eventually, some of them were accepted. My magazine pieces for children have been mostly fiction. Only two were non-fiction, an article on Jerusalem’s Biblical Zoo for Wonder Time and some turtle horoscopes for Zamoof! My adult pieces were all non-fiction, articles and humour pieces.

N&R: Are there any stories that our readers can get copies of?

RD: Some of the magazines are no longer being published, but they might be able to find back issues of Pockets (September 2003, April 2009), Spider (February 2006), Okanagan Life (June 2001, April 2005) or My Weekly (July 24, 2004). The People’s Friend is still being published, but its ‘Children Corner’ carried some of my earliest stories, and you’d have to go back quite a ways for copies of those (December 20, 1980, August 8, 1981, & April 3, 1982).

N&R: Did you lose the rights to those works that you published in magazines?

RD: No. I only sold First Time Rights. All other rights reverted to me, so I suppose I could think about posting them on my website—minus the artwork—which was created by other people.  Despite my childhood passion for doing comic books, I really don’t draw very well, but have been lucky in being matched with good illustrators. I especially like the great cover Marion Sipe did for The Disappearing Rose.

N&R: Glad you didn’t lose the rights. Some authors do and it is very frustrating for them. And that brings us to your recently published book, The Disappearing Rose from “The Time Rose Series” released by MuseItUp Publishing on August 23rd, 2013.

Tagline: The two little Princes in the Tower disappeared five centuries ago—so what are they doing in our time?

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Here is the back cover information from your book The Disappearing Rose.

            No one knows what happened to the little Princes of the Tower. That’s what Dane, Paige, and Jack are told when they start working on a medieval documentary for Dane and Paige’s filmmaker father. But then an ancient medallion transports them back to the fifteenth century and gives them a chance to discover the truth about the mysterious disappearance of young King Edward the Fifth and his brother Richard, Duke of York. But they’d better be careful. The princes are definitely in danger, and the person responsible for their disappearance just might decide that their new friends should disappear as well.

So, where did The Disappearing Rose come from?

RD: The Middle Ages have been my favourite time period for as long as I can remember, and I have been interested in the fate of the two royal brothers ever since I read about them in what my Grantie Etta character would call my ‘Tudor propagandist’ history text in school when I was about nine. Even at that age, the wicked uncle theory didn’t seem too convincing. That I would eventually want to come up with my own story about them was inevitable. Originally, I just planned a straight forward historical novel. The time travel approach came later.

N&R: How long did it take you to write the book?

RD: Due to the fact that I was involved in both the teaching and raising of children at the time, the actual writing took about two years. Research took considerably longer, and started before I had a clear idea of the book. For several years I was really just visiting places associated with the princes and their era, and learning more about it because I was interested. Though I was in London several times as a child, I never actually got to the Tower of London until my late teens, because I usually went with school or church groups and the Tower wasn’t on their itineraries.  Family visits didn’t work either because, on the one occasion we planned to go to the Tower, the queue was three quarters of the way up Tower Hill, and my father—who wasn’t big on waiting—wouldn’t. (We went to Madame Tussaud’s & the London Zoo instead.)

N&R: Were there any particular challenges or struggles to overcome to create the work?

RD: Not really. Just finding the time to do it. Now that I’m mostly retired, that isn’t quite so difficult.

N&R: When did you realize you had the makings of a series under your belt?

RD: Pretty much right away. The medallion that serves as the children’s time portal has been used by their family for generations. It has a definite purpose. In order for them to find and help the child it seeks, it must first take them to other children in trouble. The princes were the just the first of these.

N&R: Here’s an excerpt from the book, The Disappearing Rose, for our readers.

“After they had eaten, Dane remembered the paper under his hat. He took it out and studied his aunt’s translation but was unable to make anything of it. Holding it to one side so the others could see too, he read it out.

“Ancient portal, hear this plea,

Open for thy golden key.

Feel its power,

Know its might,

Put the Mists of Time to flight.”

Paige clicked her tongue. “Another cutesy little rhyme. We haven’t even figured out the first one yet.”

“No, but what it said about speaking words in proper tone had to be in reference to the ones in this rhyme. Trouble is there’s no knowing what they mean, either. ‘Open for thy golden key.’ What key? And how can a key have power?”

“The medallion’s gold,” said Jack. “Perhaps it’s the key. I don’t know what the ancient portal could be, though.”

“The door to some long forgotten temple in the middle of Armenia, I expect,” said Paige, standing up. “Maybe we should stick to uncovering secrets of the past that are closer to hand, like that secret passage you promised to show us.”

The boys got up, too. As soon as Dane had tucked the translation back under his hat, they went to the kitchen to ask Mrs. Purdom for what Jack called torches and he and Paige called flashlights. While she was getting them, Jack selected a key from a row of hooks hanging on the side of a cupboard and unlocked the cellar door at the back of the kitchen. “The cellar’s electrified,” he said, flicking on some lights, “but we’ll have to use our torches in the passage.”

“Mind you don’t get those costumes dirty,” said Mrs. Purdom.

“Someone else with a thing about clean clothes,” Dane murmured as they started down the cellar steps.

The cellar was a large one. It had other comparatively modern features besides electricity including a sink and, in a small room near the stairs, a chain-flush toilet.

“How come the secret passage is way down here, Jack?” Paige asked as they made their way past a row of wine racks. “In movies they’re always behind a bookcase or something.”

“It starts in an upstairs room in the oldest part of Rosebank,” Jack replied. “That room’s locked now, so we have to go in this way.”

Squeezing past some barrels, he led them into a storeroom. In keeping with the Wolverton family’s tradition of hoarding, Grantie Etta had filled it with disused furniture and other assorted junk. At the far end was a small wooden door covered by a curtain, a door Jack said was now the passage’s only entry point.

“It would have been the exit point once, wouldn’t it?” said Dane.

“No,” said Jack, pulling the curtain aside to unbolt the door. “The passage originally led out into a wood behind one of the gardens. The wood’s gone now, so that end of it was filled in and a door cut to give access to the cellar.”

He turned on his flashlight and shone it to one side of the passage entrance so the others could see the difference between the new masonry and the old.

“Come on,” he said, stepping inside.

Dane was sensitive to dust. His nose and throat quickly became irritated by the damp, musty odours that filled his nostrils as he and Paige followed Jack along the narrow tunnel they had entered. He wasn’t about to turn back though. He found the idea of exploring a secret passage just as intriguing as his sister did.

They walked along on level ground for a time. When not stepping over small piles of rubble, they had to take care not to slip on flagstones worn smooth by generations of feet. Farther on, winding stairs took them past the ground floor and into the upper part of the house.

At last Jack stopped in front of a stone ram that seemed to glare down at them from the wall. Handing his flashlight to Paige, he reached up and twisted the animal’s horns to open the passage’s other entrance. Much to his chagrin, nothing happened

“That’s funny,” he said. “I can’t seem to budge these horns.”

The ram didn’t respond to Paige’s efforts, either. Or Dane’s.

“The mechanism must be stuck,” said Jack. “Oh, well, there’s not much to see in there anyway. Just some old furniture and a painting or two.”

Dane pushed on the secret door itself, his medallion clinking against the stones at every shove.

Paige caught hold of it. “Hmm,” she said. “This thing’s supposed to open ancient portals. Let’s give it a try.” Stretching it out the length of its chain, she pressed it against the door. “It doesn’t seem to be working,” she said sadly.

“You didn’t do it right,” said Jack, entering into the game. “I expect it only opens things if you say the rhyme.”

“Oh, yes. I forgot about that. Okay, here goes.”

She chanted the rhyme in a silly, singsong voice, the kind of voice adults used for saying nursery rhymes to little kids.

“Well, that didn’t work, either,” she said, letting the medallion fall back against Dane’s chest. “I guess someone used up all its special power years ago.”

“You’re still not doing it right,” Dane said with a grin. “The words do have to be spoken in ‘proper tone’, you know. Let me try.”

The others giggled as he closed his fist around the medallion and held it next to his heart. They continued to giggle as he repeated the rhyme in solemn, majestic tones, emphasizing every word.

“Ancient portal, hear this plea,

Open for thy golden key.

Feel its power,

Know its might,

Put the Mists of Time to flight.”

Suddenly, sparks jumped at him from every side. Then a strange blue and white mist appeared, accompanied by a roaring sound. Within seconds, his ears were buzzing, and the whole passage spun around him.

Jack grabbed his shoulder in alarm.

“Dane, what’s happening?”

“I…I guess I did it right,” Dane gasped as the swirling mist engulfed them.”

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Picture from The Time Machine movie made in 1960 starring Rod Taylor and based on H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine.

Wow, that looks really interesting. I guess I will be getting the book asap. Time travel seems to be quite popular right now. When did you start being interested in the concept? And, well…do you think it is possible?

RD: I can’t remember if my first experience with the concept came from a book or TV, but I’ve long been intrigued by it and I do think it’s possible, though not perhaps in the manner often depicted in books.  I’ve read articles where people claim to have briefly stepped though into another time (such as pre-French revolution Versailles) but could not interact with anyone, merely observe for a time until the scene before them vanished.

N&R: I know what you mean. There are lots of recorded instances where people have claimed to have momentarily viewed another dimension or time. I would love to experience it but only if there was a guarantee of complete safety. LOL. Are the majority of your works geared toward Middle Grade readers?

RD: They are now.  I’ve really come to enjoy that age group since I started working with them.

N&R: If our readers wish to contact you, how would they get in touch? Do you have a website, twitter, blog etc?

RD: I don’t have a blog as yet. I do have a website and am on Facebook and Twitter. My son (actor/filmmaker, Richard Duke) is also planning a book trailer for the first Time Rose book, but that’s still in the idea stage.

N&R: Here are the links to purchase this e book.

Muse:   https://museituppublishing.com/bookstore/index.php/coming-soon/the-disappearing-rose-detail

Amazon.com: http://tinyurl.com/mhlyljj

Amazon.ca:  http://tinyurl.com/lostrov

Barnes and Noble, Nook Book: http://tinyurl.com/l2jjhuc

Kobo: http://store.kobobooks.com/en-CA/ebook/the-disappearing-rose-the-time-rose-series

            One last question, do you have anything you would like to share with our readers about the writing world or your experiences with the publishing industry.

RD: E-publishing is a new field for me.  I’m having to learn as I go along.

N&R: Well, thank you for dropping by, Renee. I have enjoyed getting to know you and am looking forward to reading your book in its entirety.

RD: Thank you for having me.

N&R: You can connect with Renee Duke on her website at http://www.reneeduke.ca/ .

Watch for Book Two in the saga: The Mud Rose coming in January, 2014.

 

Contest:

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Painting by Paul Delaroche.

            Okay my peeps, now you get to put on your thinking caps. Ms. Duke is offering a free copy of her book to someone who votes and leaves a comment as to why they voted the way they did. She will be watching for the most clever and interesting answer. You have five days to put on your thinking caps and file your vote. All postings must be pre-approved by me so don’t freak if they don’t show up right away. I will be watching from a distance and okaying the non-spam votes. Thank you for your participation in advance.

Here we go: What happened to the princes, King Edward the Fifth and his brother Richard, Duke of York, and who was responsible for their disappearances, is still unknown, so we are putting it to a vote, with our possible suspects being:

(A)   Richard, Duke of Gloucester (later Richard III), the uncle who reluctantly—or maybe not so reluctantly—took over the throne once the older prince had been deposed.

(B)   Henry Stafford, Duke of Buckingham, another uncle who thought the crown would look better on his head.

(C)   Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond, who became king after defeating Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth and strengthened his claim by marrying the princes’ sister, Elizabeth.

(D)  Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond, mother of Henry Tudor, who knew from the moment he was born that her boy was better suited to kingship than any of those good-for-nothing Yorkists.

(E) Elizabeth of York, who had been heir presumptive until those bratty brothers came along.

(F) Sir Thomas More, who was only five at the time, but he could have hired someone.

Please enter your vote for one of the individuals listed above and include your comment as to why you chose the person you did, in the “Leave a comment” section below this article.

We look forward to you suggestions.

Announcement: Release Day for Nightmares by author Donna Jean McDunn

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Friday May 10, 2013 is release day for the book Nightmares by author Donna Jean McDunn and so…

Today, Natter and Review would like to welcome back author Donna Jean McDunn. Here is a short biography of our visitor.

Donna Jean McDunn lives in Iowa with her husband, four cats and two dogs. She is the mother of three daughters and the grandmother of eight. Donna enjoys spending time with her family and friends, camping, fishing, bicycle riding, listening to music and dancing. She is a third degree black belt in Songham Taekwondo and loves working out. Donna writes fiction for young adults and women in her off hours, but spends most of her days as an administrative assistant. She hopes someday to retire and write full time.

N&R: Hi Donna, you’re back. Welcome to Natter and Review once again. Donna is one of my new authors with MuseItUp Publishing and tomorrow, May 10, 2013 is a very special day for Donna, as her first book, the young adult paranormal romance, Nightmares, is being released from MuseItUp Publishing. I bet you are excited!

DJM: Thank you, Lynne. Yes, I have to keep reminding myself, all of this is real!

N&R:  How about sharing a little of the story, Nightmares.

DJM: Eighteen-year old Emily Preston has it all. She’s beautiful, strong and confident.  But just weeks before graduating from high school, the nightmares she’d experienced as a child, begin to plague her once more. When a mysterious voice warns that she must remember her past and accept her gift of seeing into the future in order to save her boyfriend’s life, she believes she’s losing her mind. The nightmares escalate into visions of long ago and memories begin to return. Will Emily allow herself to accept the gift or will she lose everything, including her life.

DJM: Tagline for Nightmares: Emily must accept her gift of clairvoyance and remember her past, when a psychopath returns to kill again.

Here is a short excerpt from the book.

“She knew it was too soon to expect Tony’s return, but peered into the darkness anyway. She saw her own distorted reflection in the glass. The images shifted and changed as she watched. She felt herself being drawn into the shadows until they completely dissolved. She saw the child from her nightmares lying in a bed asleep, while a terrible thunderstorm raged outside.

Lightning flashed around the room and a crack of thunder rattled the windows. The child sat up and for the first time Emily could see her face and blond hair. A dog howled and the girl’s eyes widened with fear as she scooted off the bed.

            Her heart hammered inside her own chest to the same rhythm as the child’s. Emily wanted to warn the little girl to lie down and stay where she’d be safe. She wanted to tell her it was too late, she’d already run out of time.

“No!” Emily screamed when the child ran toward the window. “Don’t look.”’

N&R: Well thanks Donna. I won’t keep you because I know you are busy promoting your book. Please support this talented new author and buy Nightmares at the link below. Donna is planning on a sequel to the novel, so there will be more from these characters and this author coming up on the horizon.

You can find Donna at the following links:

Her blog: http://www.donnajeanmcdunn.wordpress.com

Her Facebook author page: http://www.facebook.com/DonnaJeanMcDunn   

Twitter: @02DMcDunn

To purchase the book: MuseItUp Link to Nightmares: http://tinyurl.com/c747opc

 

Congratulations Donna! We wish you much success!